Center for Computing Research (CCR)

Center for Computing Research

The Center for Computing Research (CCR) at Sandia creates technology and solutions for many of our nation's most demanding national security challenges. The Center's portfolio spans the spectrum from fundamental research to state‑of‑the‑art applications. Our work includes computer system architecture (both hardware and software); enabling technology for modeling physical and engineering systems; and research in discrete mathematics, data analytics, cognitive modeling, and decision support materials.

CCR Research

Featured News

  • QSCOUT / Jaqal at the Frontier of Quantum Computing

    DOE/ASCR is investing over 5 years in Sandia to build and host the Quantum Scientific Computing Open User Testbed (QSCOUT): a quantum testbed based on trapped ions that is available to the research community (led by Susan Clark, 5225)....

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    QSCOUT / Jaqal at the Frontier of Quantum Computing

    DOE/ASCR is investing over 5 years in Sandia to build and host the Quantum Scientific Computing Open User Testbed (QSCOUT): a quantum testbed based on trapped ions that is available to the research community (led by Susan Clark, 5225). As an open platform, it will not only provide full specifications and control for the realization of all high level quantum and classical processes, it will also enable researchers to investigate, alter, and optimize the internals of the testbed and test more advanced implementations of quantum operations. To maximize the usability and impact of QSCOUT, Sandia researchers in 1400 (Andrew Landahl, 1425) have led the development of the Jaqal quantum assembly language, which has been publicly released in conjunction with a QSCOUT emulator.  QSCOUT is currently hosting external user teams from UNM, ORNL, IBM, the University of Indiana, and the University of California at Berkeley for scientific discovery in quantum computing.

     

    For more information contact qscout@sandia.gov or visit https://www.sandia.gov/quantum/Projects/QSCOUT.html :POC: Andrew Landahl

     

    May 2021

    Contact: Landahl, Andrew J
    May 2021
    2021-5654 S

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  • Investigating Arctic Climate Variability with Global Sensitivity Analysis of Low-resolution E3SM.

     As a first step in quantifying uncertainties in simulated Arctic climate response, Sandia researchers have performed a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) using a fully coupled ultralow-resolution configuration of the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM)....

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    Investigating Arctic Climate Variability with Global Sensitivity Analysis of Low-resolution E3SM.

     As a first step in quantifying uncertainties in simulated Arctic climate response, Sandia researchers have performed a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) using a fully coupled ultralow-resolution configuration of the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM).  Coupled Earth system models are computationally expensive to run, making it difficult to generate the large ensembles required for uncertainty quantification.  In this research an ultralow version of E3SM was utilized to tractably investigate parametric uncertainty in the fully coupled model. More than one hundred perturbed simulation ensembles of one hundred years each were generated for the analysis and impacts on twelve Arctic quantities of interest were measured using the PyApprox library. The parameter variations show significant impact on the Arctic climate state with the largest impact coming from atmospheric parameters related to cloud parameterizations. To our knowledge, this is the first global sensitivity analysis involving the fully-coupled E3SM. The results will be used to inform model tuning work as well as targeted studies at higher resolution.

    Ultra-low atmosphere grid (left) and ultra-low ocean grid (right).

    Points of contact: Kara Peterson (kjpeter@sandia.gov)                Irina Tezaur (ikalash@sandia.gov)  

    For more information on E3SM: https://e3sm.org/  

     

     

    Ultra-low atmosphere grid (left) and ultra-low ocean grid (right).

    Contact: Peterson, Kara J.
    January 2021
    1267024

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